Sunday, July 22, 2018

HOME FAMILY G E N E A L O G Y

How to Incorporate Your Family Genealogy into Your Home

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Your home is the perfect canvas for self-expression. It is your opportunity to express yourself through the design and layout of your personal space. For many people, family, culture, and heritage are significant aspects of their self-identity and who they are. If you happen to be one of those people, then finding ways to project this may be one of your top priorities. There are several ways that you can do so, and may require thinking outside of the box and incorporating it into your home design and layout. On that note, you’re going to find a few ways to incorporate your family genealogy into your home in the following article.

DESIGN

When looking for ways to incorporate your family genealogy into your home, one of the first places to consider starting is in the area of design. It’s the perfect opportunity to let your genealogy inspire you and find ways to infuse who you are and your family heritage into your home. Some ways that you can do this include using prints from different eras, using colors that are representative of your culture or that at least set the right tone. You can also try looking for objects that tell a story about who you are and where you’re from to design your home as well.

STATEMENT FURNITURE PIECES

In addition to the last suggestion, statement furniture pieces are another way that you can incorporate your family genealogy into your home. If your great-grandparents were music lovers, for instance, you could add a piano, keyboard, or other furniture pieces that resemble instruments around your home. The key is to look for quality living room furniture that everyone in your family will enjoy!

PHOTO ALBUM

If you happen to have newspaper clipping and images which unveil pieces of your heritage, you should think about creating a photo album or scrapbook that you can place these in. You can then leave it on your center table or bookshelf for visitors to flip through whenever they stop by. Some ideas for creating a photo book or scrapbookinclude a scrapbook with metallic monogram and patterned pages, covering it with fabric, adding decorative labels, and customizing the pages.

WALL ART

At times, wall art has an incredible ability to tell a story in a home. For this reason, perhaps think about using it in this context as a means of incorporating your family genealogy into your abode. You could opt to choose key images, eras, or milestones to frame as a way of showing your heritage and family history. Some art arranging tips to ensure your wall art stands out include using paper to test the location you choose before putting a hole in the wall, arranging according to a common theme, and being open to taking it off the wall.
Incorporating your family genealogy into your home is something that may have a sentimental meaning to you. It can be used as a constant reminder of who you are as well as where you’re from and a way to celebrate that as well. By following some of the tips above, you should be able to interweave your genealogy in ways that are pleasing to you.
Sette House by Fabio Fantolino – discover the complete project on our ARCHISCENE.net.

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

MISSONI F U N B O Y

MISSONI x FUNBOY Butterfly Float

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MISSONI x FUNBOY
Italian fashion house Missoni teamed up with creator of original luxury pool floats Funboy to create luxurious pool float. The result of 18 months collaboration is the limited edition MISSONI x FUNBOY Butterfly float that mixes FUNBOY‘s original float design with MISSONI‘s signature patterns.
The MISSONI x FUNBOY Butterfly features an elegant and graceful wing shape engineered to gently rise out of the water when lounging on the float, creating a sensation of flying across the water. MISSONI’s artwork features masterful gradients of color combined with nature inspired shapes and patterns. Each side of the float features a distinctive colorway to create two unique floats in one.
“Our family has always been transfixed by Missoni’s use of color and geometric shapes and we knew it would translate into an incredible three dimensional pool float. We reached-out over DM to Angela hoping she would share our vision.” – Blake Barrett Co-Founder, FUNBOY

MISSONI x FUNBOY
MISSONI x FUNBOY
MISSONI x FUNBOY
MISSONI x FUNBOY
MISSONI x FUNBOY
MISSONI x FUNBOY
MISSONI x FUNBOY
MISSONI x FUNBOY

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

DESIGN D E C I S I O N S

Important Design Decisions for Coliving Space

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Coliving Space
With housing costs skyrocketing in virtually every major city across the map, pressure is growing to provide affordable living options to more than the working wealthy and upper elite. Increasingly, the preferred choice in many of these urban cores seems to be the development and design of coliving space. Spearheaded by New York-based startup Common.com and similar companies, the concept of coliving – also known as shared housing – is an efficient use of living space meant to help people slash their cost of living while managing to still live in the place they want.
Yet with this new development comes an array of design requirements which are critical to the success of a coliving space. How the rooms look and function, how they relate to the shared spaces, and several other factors all contribute to whether or not shared housing proves to be a viable option for those in search of an affordable living situation. For coliving space to succeed as an enterprise as well as exist as an option comparable to alternative forms of housing, its design elements must incorporate the following:

THE ROOMS

In most shared housing situations, each resident gets his or her own room. The first instinct from a design point-of-view would be to create a hotel or dorm-like space, where everyone’s room opens out to a long hallway, but this option has its flaws in a coliving setting. Mainly, it does not maximize the efficiency of space like a floorplan in which rooms open out to the commons areas. As far as the rooms themselves go, it’s imperative to make the most of the limited space. Shelving, foldaways, and other ways to take advantage of vertical space need to be utilized as much as possible.
Coliving Space

THE SHARED SPACE

Designing the shared space of a coliving environment is probably the most challenging part of the process. First and foremost is the need to consider the number of residents which a given shared space is expected to accommodate at any given time. For instance, can a kitchen or a living room accessible to 12 people fit all of them at once? While not everyone will be together all the time, it’s critical to have room for them when they do, if possible. Now is the time to feel free to be liberal with space, as confined and constricted areas meant for multiple people will feel uncomfortable at best, unbearable at worst. This will involve various design tricks to make rooms and other areas seem larger than they are, as shared housing is inherently limited on space.
Coliving Space
Coliving Space

THE FACADE

When someone chooses to rent in a coliving environment, they are agreeing to make certain trade-offs in exchange for a lower cost of living. However, they still want to be able to point to a building and say “That’s where I live.” and better yet, want to be proud of it when they do. For designers and architects of shared housing, it can be tempting to be frugal about the facade in order to better please the developers’ price expectations, but that doesn’t mean it has to be plain or otherwise unremarkable. Take a creative approach to building facade design in order to come up with something which is original, attractive, and under budget.

THE GREENSPACE

By virtue of the fact space is so limited that the very way we live is being redesigned to better accommodate more people, greenspace is often hard to find in these places. Therefore, any kind of garden, terrace, or yard which can be incorporated into coliving space will be a welcome refuge for residents and a draw for applicants. Similar to the interior shared space, a coliving greenspace needs to feel open and airy while simultaneously maximizing every available inch. If possible, plan the greenspace around a pretty view. Place trees and bushes strategically to keep their growth from confining the space over time. If possible, avoid fencing to further open up the area.
With coliving becoming a growing trend for young urban professionals, the door is opening up for architects and designers to get involved in shared housing from the ground up. How they approach the concept of coliving will shape its success in the decades to come.
All images from Wormwhole Apartment by Dash Marshall – see more on our architecture and interior design magazine ARCHISCENE.net.